Items filtered by date: September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

How Severe Is My Turf Toe?

Turf toe, also known as a metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint sprain, is an injury common in sports like football, soccer, basketball, gymnastics, dancing, and wrestling. When the big toe is bent too far back during activity, the ligaments or joint capsule underneath the toe can overstretch or tear. MTP joint sprains are classified into three groups based on their severity. A Grade 1 sprain is mild and characterized by localized pain and minimal swelling. A Grade 2 sprain is characterized by moderate pain, swelling, and bruising of the big toe. A Grade 3 sprain is severe and involves intense pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty moving the big toe. If you have turf toe, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible. 

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Paul Potach, DPM of Illinois . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Wheeling and Berwyn, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot And Ankle Injuries

Fall is the start of the season for many sporting events. If you're trying a new physical activity or sport, it's important to practice injury prevention.

Have a foot or ankle injury? Don't wait to get treated.

Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

How Do Doctors Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of that can occur because of diabetes. People with diabetes often have poor circulation and neuropathy which make foot wounds slow to heal and difficult to detect. If your doctor spots a DFU on your foot, there are several potential treatment options, depending on the severity of the wound. Your doctor may debride the wound by removing dead tissue. A bandage will usually be placed over the wound to keep the area moist and protect it from infection. Taking pressure off of the wound, by resting the foot and using cushions, braces, or orthotics, will help it heal. In very severe cases, surgery may be necessary. If you have a DFU, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Paul Potach, DPM from Illinois . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Wheeling and Berwyn, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis

Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is a chronic disorder where the body’s own immune system attacks healthy joints and produces inflammation, pain, tenderness, warmth, swelling, and joint damage. Nails can also lift up from the nail bed and become pitted or cracked with white spots. Symptoms are different for everyone—ranging from mild to severe—and may come and go, and even flare on occasion. PsA can occur in the joints of the foot, ankle, and toes—giving them a sausage-like appearance. It may also cause the sole of the foot or heel to ache. Symptoms are typically asymmetrical, meaning they may occur on only one side of the body. Some believe that genetics make some people more susceptible to the disease. These people are at an increased risk of contracting it after being exposed to an infection, physical trauma, or stress. Many people with PsA also have psoriasis—a skin disease causing red, itchy, scaly, and patchy skin. If you feel or see anything that is similar to the symptoms listed here, make an appointment with a podiatrist for an accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact Paul Potach, DPM from Illinois . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a joint disorder that involves the inflammation of different joints in your body, such as those in your feet. Arthritis is often caused by a degenerative joint disease and causes mild to severe pain in all affected areas. In addition to this, swelling and stiffness in the affected joints can also be a common symptom of arthritis.

In many cases, wearing ill-fitting shoes can worsen the effects and pain of arthritis. Wearing shoes that have a lower heel and extra room can help your feet feel more comfortable. In cases of rheumatoid arthritis, the arch in your foot may become problematic. Buying shoes with proper arch support that contour to your feet can help immensely.

Alleviating Arthritic Pain

  • Exercises that stretch the foot can prevent further pain and injury and increase mobility
  • Most of the pain can be alleviated with anti-inflammatory drugs, heat, and topical medications
  • Massages can help temporarily alleviate pain.

It is best to see your doctor for the treatment that is right for your needs and symptoms. Conditions vary, and a podiatrist can help you determine the right method of care for your feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Wheeling and Berwyn, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Arthritic Foot Care
Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

Is Peripheral Artery Disease Dangerous?

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition in which circulation in the lower limbs is reduced, typically due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries that causes them to narrow and harden, thereby impeding blood flow. Common symptoms of PAD in the lower limbs include cramping, fatigue, aching, pain, or discomfort. The pain may be especially noticeable when walking or climbing stairs. It usually goes away when you are at rest, but returns when you resume activities. In some individuals, PAD is asymptomatic, going undiagnosed until it has progressed and begins to show symptoms. PAD can make heart attacks, strokes, amputation, and gangrene more likely. Because of this, it is important to get regular vascular testing, especially if you are older, have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or a history of cardiovascular disease or type II diabetes. To learn more about PAD and to get tested, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist near you. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Paul Potach, DPM from Illinois . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Wheeling and Berwyn, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease

Connect With Us

5 out of 5 stars
Total Reviews : 126